What if you could live multiple lives simultaneously, have constant, perfect companionship, and never die?

A searing, ballistic plunge into the mysteries of identity and mortality. Its ingenious core is revealed and amplified by high voltage suspense and murder. Delicious.
— Katherine Dunn, author of Geek Love

Recommended new science fiction–“a scientifically satisfying [story] of what is to come.”
— Scientific American

Smart, imaginative extrapolation about technology and a deep curiosity about civilization and the human condition.
— NPR.org

A conceptual powerhouse, tapping into the core of our contemporary debates about technology.
— Tor.com

From the first page, Toutonghi launches us into a strange and fascinating new world.
— Charles Yu, author of How to Live Safely in a Science Fictional Universe

Set in a dystopian world full of dazzle and invention, Join is a subtle exploration of what the self is and what death means.
— David Vann, author of Legend of a Suicide and Aquarium

Amazon Best Books of the Month, April 2016.

JOIN, from SOHO PRESS. Find a BOOKSTORE in your area, or order at:

AMAZON
GOODREADS | BARNES & NOBLE
POWELL’S | KOBO | INDIGO

Challenging, surprising, shocking, and enlightening. Steve Toutonghi’s Join stands alongside Ancillary Justice as a novel that forces us to ask impossible questions about identity and immortality. An exciting addition to 21st century science fiction.
— Robert Repino, author of Mort(e)

From the first page, Toutonghi launches us into a strange and fascinating new world, exploring ideas with nuance and verve. Strikingly original and deeply imaginative.
— Charles Yu, author of How to Live Safely in a Science Fictional Universe

Join is that rare thing, an appealing novel that’s both literary and commercial. Set in a dystopian world full of dazzle and invention, Join is a subtle exploration of what the self is and what death means. As we read about individuals joining into a unified consciousness, we have to wonder what our aspirations and fears truly are and what can be called us.
— David Vann, author of Aquarium

A deeply-relevant, humane work of speculative fiction. It takes a concept that’s ripped from today’s news headlines — the technology-enabled linkage of biological neural networks — and turns it into a great story. It’s a compelling book. Don’t miss it!
— Peyton Marshall, author of Goodhouse